Places of Interest

Barnehurst has several places of local interest nearby including the recently restored Hall Place (Crayford) and the Red House built for William Morris. Eltham Palace, 10 minute drive away, is also a local gem. The Red House, BexleyheathThis medieval royal palace (dating back to 1305) has many features from the medieval period and also features unique art deco style from later owners.

As Barnehurst is only 40 minutes from central London where you have a wealth of things to do and see. Locally trains to Lewisham only take about 20 minutes from Barnehurst. The DLR from Lewisham can take you to Docklands for shopping, museums, cinemas etc. and also Greenwich. Greenwich has the Cutty Sark, Old Royal Naval College, Museums and much more to offer.

Red House

Red House 13 Red House Lane, Bexleyheath, Kent, DA6 8JF
www.friends-red-house.co.uk

The Red House was built in 1859 for the Victorian artist, designer and poet William Morris. Morris moved into the house, designed by architect Philip Webb, after his marriage to Jane Burden and it was to become the couple's home for five years. The house, which retains some original furniture and decor, includes wallpaper that Morris was famous for. It opens for guided tours on the first full weekend of every month except January.

Hall Place & Gardens

Hall Place Bourne Road, Bexley, 01322 526574
www.hallplaceandgardens.com

Originally built around 1537 for the Lord Mayor of London, Sir John Champneis. Hall Place is now a Grade 1 listed building set in beautiful formal gardens on the banks of the River Cray. The house was extended in the 17th century and is open all year round. Concerts, exhibitions, private functions and weddings also take place here. There is an information centre on site and gardens are open all year round.

Erith Museum

Walnut Tree Road, Erith DA8 1RS. 01322 336582
www.erithmuseum.org.uk

A local museum housed above the Grade II listed Erith Library. The museum charts the history of Erith and the development of its maritime and aviation industries. Various exhibitions are also held in the museum. The museum is open Monday, Wednesday and Sunday afternoons.

Crossness Pumping

Station Belvedere Road, Thamesmead. 01689 832290
www.crossness.org.uk

Crossness Pumping StationOpened by the Prince of Wales in 1865 as part of Victorian London's urgently needed main drainage scheme. The station houses the largest rotative beam engines in the world, built by James Watt and Sons. Both the building and the spectacular cast iron machinery are being restored to their former glory by the Crossness Engines Trust and the station is open to the public by appointment.

Eltham Palace Eltham Palace

Eltham Palace, Court Yard Off Court Road, Eltham, SE9 5QE 020 8294 2548
www.elthampalace.org.uk

This medieval royal palace (dating back to 1305) still has many original remains intact including the moat and impressive Great Hall. The Great Hall was built in the 1470's under Edward IV. Henry VIII was Art Deco seen at Eltham Palacethe last monarch to spend substantial amounts of money or time at Eltham and in the 16th century the Palace was eclipsed by Greenwich Palace and declined rapidly. In the mid 17th century, the owner, Sir John Shaw, built Eltham Lodge in the Great Park and lived there. In 1930, after decades of neglect, the house was bought by Stephen and Virginia Courtauld who created a magnificant art deco house for entertaining. They incorporated the Great Hall into their design to utilise the excellent acoustics in the hall as a music room thus creating the unique blend of Medieval and Art Deco that you see today.

Parks and Open Spaces

For Danson Park and more open spaces in Barnehurst please click here.

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Barnehurst in pictures

View Barnehurst photos Take a look at Barnehurst including the golf course, Bursted Wood, Midfield Parade and more.

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Barnehurst, is that Bexleyheath?

LetterThe identity of Barnehurst is evaporating - why? Because our post code is under Bexleyheath sorting office. I look into why we can't name the name of where we live.

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